Difference Between AICD and Pacemaker (With Table)

When we talk about devices, we normally divide them into two categories; there are pacemakers and defibrillators. In this article, we’ll look at the differences between both.

AICD vs Pacemaker

The main difference between AICD and Pacemakers is that AICDs are similar to the pads you see on TV; when someone goes into a life-threatening abnormal rhythm, they are shocked by an EMS team and returned to a normal rhythm; on the other hand, Pacemakers can pace your heart rate if it becomes too slow.

An AICD is a small implanted device that continuously monitors your heart and, if it detects a harmful irregular rhythm, it sends out mild electrical impulses to try to restore normal heart rhythm. If it doesn’t work, shock therapy will be used to try to get your heart back into a regular rhythm.

Slow heart rate causes fatigue, dizziness, lightheadedness, and even passing out in some people. A pacemaker is a tiny medical device that is implanted beneath the skin beneath the collarbone to treat symptoms of a sluggish heartbeat.

Comparison Table Between AICD and Pacemaker

Parameters of ComparisonAICDPacemaker
MeaningAICD aid in the prevention or treatment of a possibly deadly arrhythmia that might result in abrupt cardiac arrest. Pacemakers aid in the regular pulse and rhythm of the heart.
PurposeIn the occurrence of tachycardia, an AICD watches the heart rate then delivers a powerful electrical shock to bring your heart rate back on track. It is a battery-operated, tiny device that keeps the heart beating at a normal pace.
Where is it placed? AICD is commonly inserted right below the collarbone on the left side. The pacemaker is often placed right underneath the collarbone in the chest.
Developed by In 1970, Michel Mirowski virtually single-handedly created and constructed the ICD. Engineer Wilson Greatbatch and Dr Andrew Gage worked together in 1958 to implant the first pacemaker.
Other namesAICD is an abbreviation for Automatic Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator. Pacesetter, asystole, implant, mechanical-heart, pacer, cardiac pacemaker, artificial pacemaker and sinoatrial node are some words used.

What is AICD?

When the electrical machine in the heart fails to regulate heartbeat, it can cause life-threatening irregular cardiac rhythms, necessitating the use of an Automatic Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (AICD).

An AICD is a small implanted device that continuously monitors your heart and, if it detects a harmful irregular rhythm, sends mild electrical shocks to try to restore normal heart rhythm. If it doesn’t work, shock therapy will be used to try to get your heart to return to a normal rhythm.

An AICD, on the other hand, will not improve your heart function or make you feel better daily. If an AICD is being transplanted into a person’s body, it will be done as a day operation. On the day of their procedure, the person must report to the hospital.

A small incision or cut will be made under your collarbone after numbing the skin in the area, and a wire will be sent down the vein using x-ray guidance into the right ventricle of the heart.

The AICD may be implanted or anchored under the skin near the stomach in some situations. After that, the AICD will be put to the test. It will take two to four hours to complete the process.

The implantation of an AICD is safe, but as with any surgical surgery, there is a risk of problems. The doctor will discuss these risks with the patient during the procedure.

What is Pacemaker?

Heart rate is determined by the electrical activity within the heart; if this electrical activity is delayed, a slow heart rhythm may result.

Slow heart rates make people feel weary, disoriented, lightheaded or even pass out. A pacemaker is a tiny medical device that is implanted beneath the skin beneath the collarbone to treat symptoms associated with a slow heartbeat.

A pulse generator and a wire or lead are the two components of a pacemaker. The lead is inserted into a vein and contacted by the heart muscle.

The heart rate is regularly monitored by the pulse generator. When a person’s heart rate falls below a specific threshold, an impulse is sent down the lead to the heart, causing it to beat.

A pacemaker requires just little surgery, which takes approximately an hour. During the procedure, patients are awake and given a light sedative.

A small incision is made under the collarbone and the region is frozen. The lead is then guided by an x-ray through the vein to the right side of the heart. The lead is then attached to the pulse generator, and eyesight is closed. Patients are frequently discharged the next day.

The most common hazards of pacemaker surgery include bruising, bleeding, and soreness surrounding the incision. Infection or a pacemaker lead migrating, needing another treatment to reposition it, are two more hazards.

Main Differences Between AICD and Pacemaker

  1. AICD aids in the prevention or treatment of a possibly deadly arrhythmia that might result in abrupt cardiac arrest while pacemakers aid in the regular pulse and rhythm of the heart.
  2. AICD is commonly inserted right below the collarbone on the left side, on the other hand, the pacemaker is often placed right underneath the collarbone in the chest.
  3. In 1970, Michel Mirowski virtually single-handedly created and constructed the ICD while Engineer Wilson Greatbatch and Dr Andrew Gage worked together in 1958 to implant the first pacemaker.
  4. In the occurrence of tachycardia, an AICD watches the heart rate then delivers a powerful electrical shock to bring your heart rate back on track, on the other hand, the pacemaker is a battery-operated, tiny device that keeps the heart beating at a normal pace.
  5. AICD is an abbreviation for Automatic Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator while pacesetter, asystole, implant, mechanical-heart, pacer, cardiac pacemaker, artificial pacemaker and sinoatrial node are some words used for a pacemaker.

Conclusion

Because all defibrillators can shock someone out of an extremely fast rhythm, but they also have pacemaker capabilities, the AICD is like having those pads with you at all times. A defibrillator can also act as a pacemaker if a person’s heart rate falls too low. As a result, pacemakers can be defibrillators, but pacemakers can’t shock like defibrillators.

The battery in an AICD and a pacemaker is housed within the device, and these are relatively long-lasting batteries. Depending on the gadget, they can last anywhere from five to ten years.

References

  1. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://ether.stanford.edu/library/cardiac_anesthesia/Electrophysiology/ICD%27s.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwjg39Sqxa_2AhVHA94KHY7fAAUQFnoECBEQAQ&usg=AOvVaw0tOs7O83KAvVyo8v3nsTc0
  2. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.heart.org/-/media/files/health-topics/answers-by-heart/what-is-a-pacemaker.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwi6-5XTxa_2AhXBz2EKHeQrAWEQFnoECAYQAQ&usg=AOvVaw3rn601F2R4fQphXP-xXt2-