Difference Between ADH and Aldosterone (With Table)

The two most significant hormones in the body that regulate blood pressure are the anti-diuretic hormone (also known as ADH) and aldosterone. When the body needs to conserve water, it increases the amount of ADH present in the blood. The opposite occurs when the body needs to increase the amount of blood passing through the kidneys, it increases the amount of aldosterone in the blood. The two hormones work together to keep the blood pressure within a normal range.

ADH vs Aldosterone

The main difference between ADH and Aldosterone is that ADH is involved in the regulation of fluid balance in the collecting duct cells of the kidneys and is therefore involved in the regulation of the salt and water content of the blood. On the other hand, Aldosterone is primarily involved in the regulation of fluid balance in the tubule cells of the kidney.

Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) is a peptide hormone produced in the hypothalamus. It is mainly released in the kidneys, where it plays a crucial role in water balance and blood pressure. ADH causes the kidneys to absorb more water from the urine, which reduces urine volume and increases blood volume.

Aldosterone is a hormone that regulates the amount of salt and water in the body. It is produced in the adrenal glands, which sit above the kidneys. The main function of aldosterone is to regulate the amount of salt in the body, which is vital for keeping the right amount of fluid in the tissues.

Comparison Table Between ADH and Aldosterone

Parameters of ComparisonADHAldosterone
About ADH is a peptide hormone produced in the hypothalamus. It is produced in the adrenal glands, which sit above the kidneys.
Functions ADH causes the kidneys to absorb more water from the urine, which reduces urine volume and increases blood volume. The main function of aldosterone is to regulate the amount of salt in the body, which is vital for keeping the right amount of fluid in the tissues.
Abbreviation forADH stands for Antidiuretic hormone.Aldosterone stands for Aldosterone.
HormonePeptide hormoneSteroid hormone
Side effectsDazedness, chest torment, heaving, feverLow pulse, weariness, and muscle shortcoming

What is ADH?

ADH, also known as antidiuretic hormone, is secreted in response to changes in body water status, such as increases in body water caused by drinking or urination, or decreases in body water caused by the loss of water through perspiration.

This hormone is responsible for the sensation of thirst and the ability to retain or lose water weight. In normal individuals, ADH secretion is under the control of the body’s water balance, which is maintained through a system of feedback loops.

ADH regulates the amount of water in the body by controlling the secretion of antidiuretic hormone (ADH). ADH tells the kidneys to retain water and the cells of the body to prevent water loss. It does this by binding to receptors in the cells that control water and salt (water reabsorption) and in the cells that promote water loss (water secretion). When ADH is secreted, it causes these cells to increase their water reabsorption or decrease their water loss.

The antidiuretic hormone (ADH) is a hormone that controls the amount of urine produced by the kidneys. The amount of urine produced by the kidneys is largely determined by the concentration of water in the blood.

What is Aldosterone?

Aldosterone is a hormone produced by the kidneys, which regulates the amount of salt and water in the body. It is primarily responsible for raising blood pressure when salt levels are low, and lowering it when salt levels are high.

It also controls the amount of water in the body and has a number of other functions related to keeping the body in homeostasis. It is secreted in response to the hormone angiotensin and is the primary means of regulating blood pressure and fluid levels in the body.

It regulates the amount of water that is retained in the body. This helps to keep the body’s blood pressure and blood volume within normal ranges. It is also known as a mineralocorticoid since it regulates the body’s electrolyte and water balance through its effects on the kidneys and the amount of sodium and water that is excreted in the urine.

When we’re young, aldosterone helps keep our body fluids in balance by stimulating the kidneys to retain sodium and excrete water. As we age, however, our aldosterone levels decline, which causes the body to retain fluid and become bloated.

Main Differences Between ADH and Aldosterone

  1. ADH is a peptide hormone produced in the hypothalamus. Whereas, Aldosterone is produced in the adrenal glands, which sit above the kidneys.
  2. ADH causes the kidneys to absorb more water from the urine, which reduces urine volume and increases blood volume. The main function of aldosterone on the other hand, is to regulate the amount of salt in the body, which is vital for keeping the right amount of fluid in the tissues.
  3. ADH stands for Antidiuretic hormone and Aldosterone stands for Aldosterone.
  4. ADH is a peptide hormone, whereas Aldosterone is a steroid hormone.
  5. ADH causes Dazedness, chest torment, heaving, fever, whereas, Aldosterone causes Low pulse, weariness, and muscle shortcoming.

Conclusion

Aldosterone and antidiuretic hormone (sometimes abbreviated as ADH and also known as Bridgestone or D2) are hormones that are produced in the zona glomerulosa of the adrenal cortex. Aldosterone is responsible for the retention of water and sodium in the body and is therefore colloquially known as the “water retention hormone”.

ADH is responsible for the increased urinary excretion of water and sodium in response to decreased blood volume, and is therefore colloquially known as the “sodium retention hormone”. The two hormones are produced in separate areas of the adrenal cortex and function in an antagonistic manner to each other.

Aldosterone is produced by the adrenal cortex in response to increases in blood volume. In contrast, the antidiuretic hormone (also known as vasopressin) is a hormone that acts on the kidneys to reduce the production of urine.

References

  1. https://journals.physiology.org/doi/abs/10.1152/jappl.1980.48.2.249
  2. https://europepmc.org/article/cba/325812
  3. https://journals.physiology.org/doi/abs/10.1152/ajplegacy.1972.222.5.1071